Hamilton council

Auditors say city in good financial health

HAMILTON - Financial records from 2019 show the City of Hamilton in good financial health.
The Hamilton City Council heard results from their Fiscal Year 2019 audit during a city council meeting on Monday, Sept. 21.
The audit report spans the previous fiscal year, which occurred during October 2018 and September 2019.
The city’s finances were audited by certified public accountants Leanna Jones and Aimee Gilliland of Riggs Accounting in Hamilton.

 

Watha withdraws Baby Street rezone plan after public opposition

HAMILTON - A Hamilton businessman has withdrawn a rezoning application after local residents spoke out against his plans to build an apartment building.
The Hamilton City Council hosted a public hearing prior to a regular session on Tuesday, Sept. 7, to hear comments concerning a proposal by local businessman Watha Williams, who was seeking to build a multi-apartment dwelling on a half-acre lot on Baby Street, which is formally known as 2nd Ave. SW.

City passes grease ordinance

HAMILTON - In a measure to curb sewage backflows, Hamilton officials have passed an ordinance granting city inspectors the authority to inspect grease traps.
At the recommendation of Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams and Hamilton Mayor Bob Page, the Hamilton City Council considered the Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG) ordinance during a regular meeting on Monday, June 15.

City ordering new garbage truck

HAMILTON - Substantial changes are ahead for Hamilton’s garbage detail.
City officials have given the OK to place an order for a new garbage truck. The new unit will feature a robotic lift arm that will be used to grab trash receptacles from the side of the road and empty them into the truck’s compactor.
The change will require all residents to have compatible trash cans. Most pick-up schedules will likely be affected as well.

Sanitation, street departments split


Hamilton Street Superintendent Mike Johnson discusses how the city will benefit from splitting its current street department into a street and sanitation department. Also shown is Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams.

HAMILTON - Street and sanitation operations will be divided into their own departments.
The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously to divide the city’s street department during a meeting on Monday, May 18.
The division came at the recommendation of former Hamilton Street Superintendent Mike Johnson,  who says the two departments will better serve the city with a separate supervisor managing street and sanitation work.

Hamilton water manager requesting grease ordinance


Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams (left) discusses sewage issues with the Hamilton City Council. Williams believes facilities are not properly emptying their grease traps. Also shown are (clockwise, from left) Tami Lewis Williams and Gene Sanderson, mayor Bob Page and councilors Wade Sullins and Herb Winsett. [Scott johnson/staff]

By Scott Johnson
Managing Editor

HAMILTON - Officials want to tighten up accountability for how Hamilton businesses and facilities are disposing of grease.
Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams appeared before the Hamilton City Council during a work session on Wednesday, May 13, explaining the need for a local ordinance that would empower the city to obtain documented proof of how local facilities are disposing of their grease.

Officials discuss opening city back up

HAMILTON - When will our economy reopen? That’s the million-dollar question across the nation right now. It’s the big question locally, too.
The Hamilton City Council met on Monday, April 20, with minimal attendance in order to adhere to social-distancing requirements  due to COVID-19. The council broadcasted its meeting by way of 49 County News, a local online news outlet.

City officials lock in with jail plan


The Marion County Commission met with the Hamilton City Council during a work session on Wednesday, March 11.>

HAMILTON - A new Marion County Jail is beginning to become more of a reality.
The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously during its Monday, March 16, meeting to pledge $200,000 a year to the Marion County Commission to help cover payments for up to a $10 million bond for a new jail.
The pledge was passed with a provision that the commission not raise lock-up fees for the Hamilton Police Department.

Hamilton locks in with jail plan

Marion County Commissioner Bob Burleson discusses the commission’s plan to use the county’s one-cent hospital tax to fund a new jail facility.

• Bedford industrial plot priced at $10,000/acre for new jail site

HAMILTON - A new Marion County Jail is beginning to become more of a reality.

The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously during its Monday, March 16, meeting to pledge $200,000 a year to the Marion County Commission to help cover payments for up to a $10 million bond for a new jail.

The pledge was passed with a provision that the commission not raise lock-up fees for the Hamilton Police Department.