Hamilton council

Sanitation, street departments split


Hamilton Street Superintendent Mike Johnson discusses how the city will benefit from splitting its current street department into a street and sanitation department. Also shown is Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams.

HAMILTON - Street and sanitation operations will be divided into their own departments.
The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously to divide the city’s street department during a meeting on Monday, May 18.
The division came at the recommendation of former Hamilton Street Superintendent Mike Johnson,  who says the two departments will better serve the city with a separate supervisor managing street and sanitation work.

Hamilton water manager requesting grease ordinance


Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams (left) discusses sewage issues with the Hamilton City Council. Williams believes facilities are not properly emptying their grease traps. Also shown are (clockwise, from left) Tami Lewis Williams and Gene Sanderson, mayor Bob Page and councilors Wade Sullins and Herb Winsett. [Scott johnson/staff]

By Scott Johnson
Managing Editor

HAMILTON - Officials want to tighten up accountability for how Hamilton businesses and facilities are disposing of grease.
Hamilton Water Superintendent Rodney Williams appeared before the Hamilton City Council during a work session on Wednesday, May 13, explaining the need for a local ordinance that would empower the city to obtain documented proof of how local facilities are disposing of their grease.

Officials discuss opening city back up

HAMILTON - When will our economy reopen? That’s the million-dollar question across the nation right now. It’s the big question locally, too.
The Hamilton City Council met on Monday, April 20, with minimal attendance in order to adhere to social-distancing requirements  due to COVID-19. The council broadcasted its meeting by way of 49 County News, a local online news outlet.

City officials lock in with jail plan


The Marion County Commission met with the Hamilton City Council during a work session on Wednesday, March 11.>

HAMILTON - A new Marion County Jail is beginning to become more of a reality.
The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously during its Monday, March 16, meeting to pledge $200,000 a year to the Marion County Commission to help cover payments for up to a $10 million bond for a new jail.
The pledge was passed with a provision that the commission not raise lock-up fees for the Hamilton Police Department.

Hamilton locks in with jail plan

Marion County Commissioner Bob Burleson discusses the commission’s plan to use the county’s one-cent hospital tax to fund a new jail facility.

• Bedford industrial plot priced at $10,000/acre for new jail site

HAMILTON - A new Marion County Jail is beginning to become more of a reality.

The Hamilton City Council voted unanimously during its Monday, March 16, meeting to pledge $200,000 a year to the Marion County Commission to help cover payments for up to a $10 million bond for a new jail.

The pledge was passed with a provision that the commission not raise lock-up fees for the Hamilton Police Department.

Love’s to build in April

HAMILTON - Construction on Hamilton’s new Love’s Travel Stop and Country Store has been pushed back again.

Hamilton Mayor Bob Page told the council during a work session held on Wednesday, Feb. 26, that Love’s March 21 start date has been delayed until April.

Love’s officials had projected construction on its new $12 million facility to begin in December. The store will be located off Interstate 22’s Exit 14 in Hamilton, off County Road 35 and River Road Drive.

Employees paid $189,000 in overtime last year

HAMILTON - Last year, the City of Hamilton paid out just shy of $190,000 in overtime pay to city employees.
Councilman Gene Sanderson brought up the matter during a Hamilton City Council work session on Wednesday, Feb. 26.
“Why do we have $65,000 in overtime in the police department?” Sanderson asked. “I don’t understand how it could be run up that much. We could hire two more police officers full-time.”

Sanderson wants a good deal for county


Hamilton City Councilman Gene Sanderson urges fellow council members to take care in how much the Marion County Commission is charged for the 5.1-acre Bedford Industrial Park property, which the commission may use to build the new Marion County Jail. Also pictured is councilwoman Tammy Lewis-Williams.

HAMILTON - Hamilton City Councilman Gene Sanderson urged fellow Hamilton City Council members to take care in how much the Marion County Commission is charged for the 5.1-acre Bedford Industrial Park property, which the commission may use to build the new Marion County Jail.
This topic was raised during discussions concerning an appraisal for the property during a regular meeting on Monday, Feb. 20, at Hamilton City Hall.

Water rates increased

HAMILTON - Concluding a two-year debate on how to balance the Hamilton Water Department budget, the Hamilton City Council has passed a significant rate increase.
During a meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 18, the council voted 4-1 to level out its volume billing scale on water and raise sewer rates to equal 100% of a customer’s water bill.
Customers billed at the minimum rate will continue to pay $20.38. Minimum billing is issued for accounts using less than 2,000 gallons of water.

Fees waived for Jerry Brown Arts Festival artists

HAMILTON – The Jerry Brown Arts Festival is gearing up for another year.
During the Hamilton City Council’s meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 21, officials authorized the Northwest Alabama Arts Council     to host its 18th Jerry Brown Arts Festival event, which will take place March 7 and 8 at Tombigbee’s facility off of County Road 55.
At the request of arts council president Dr. Dan Dunkin, the council also waived business license requirements for participating artists and vendors. Durkin noted that each vendor is still required to record and collect sales taxes.